What Happens When Wrongful Death Beneficiary Dies During Lawsuit? Depends on Whether there are Heirs

What Happens When Wrongful Death Beneficiary Dies During Lawsuit? Depends on Whether there are Heirs

The takeaway from this post is that if you are representing a wrongful death estate and the survivor has no natural heir, make sure s/he has a will or the claim will die with the survivor.

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Why Summary Judgment Predicated on Defense of Contributory Negligence is Almost Impossible in Indiana

Why Summary Judgment Predicated on Defense of Contributory Negligence is Almost Impossible in Indiana

Today, we look at the propriety of adjudicating personal injury cases on the basis of a contributory negligence defense at summary judgment through the lens of the new decision in Gonzalez v. Ritz. We also examine the burden on a movant to establish that evidence would certainly not be admissible at trial in order to exclude it at summary judgment.

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Indiana: Who Can Bring Claim for Death of Child When Both Parents Also Die?

Indiana: Who Can Bring Claim for Death of Child When Both Parents Also Die?

In this post, we discuss Parsley v. MGA Family Group, Inc., which held that a grandmother as de facto guardian was not able to pursue a child wrongful death claim for the death of her grandson. After questioning whether the Indiana Court of Appeals reached the right decision, we examine what the procedure is in general to pursue a claim when a child’s custodian is killed alongside the child.

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Indiana: What to Do When Discovering After the Statute of Limitations Expires That the Wrong Party Was Named?

Indiana: What to Do When Discovering After the Statute of Limitations Expires That the Wrong Party Was Named?

This week we look at the decision in Webb v. City of Carmel and look to use of Trial Rule 15(C) for adding a new party after the statute of limitations has expired. We also discuss whether the court of appeals misapplied Indiana’s summary judgment standard in this case, wherein there is no mention whatsoever of the movants’ evidence, only a determination that the non-movant’s evidence was insufficient.

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Did the Indiana Court of Appeals Just Rewrite Trial Rule 75(A)?

Did the Indiana Court of Appeals Just Rewrite Trial Rule 75(A)?

This week, we look at a recent decision from the Indiana Court of Appeals that looks to have established a new, non-textual standard for determining preferred venue in Indiana. In so doing, the opinion looks to have manifested the concerns of Justices Dickson and Rucker in their dissenting opinion to R & D Transport, Inc. v. A.H.

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When Does a Proprietor Owe a Duty to Stop One Patron from Shooting Another? Indiana Court of Appeals Weighs In

When Does a Proprietor Owe a Duty to Stop One Patron from Shooting Another? Indiana Court of Appeals Weighs In

This week we look at the remarkable decision in Hamilton v. Steak'n Shake Operations Inc., which took a deep dive into the analyses of Goodwin v. Yeakle's Sports Bar & Grill and Rogers v. Martin to conclude that a restaurant proprietor owes a duty to take reasonable precautions to protect a "restaurant patron who has been subjected to escalating threats and taunts" from "injury resulting after the encounter culminated in physical violence."

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Indiana Court of Appeals: Failure to Respond to Cross-Motion for Summary Judgment Not Necessarily Fatal

Indiana Court of Appeals: Failure to Respond to Cross-Motion for Summary Judgment Not Necessarily Fatal

This week we discuss an interesting circumstance of whether failure to file a response to a cross-motion for summary judgment prohibits reliance upon evidence filed in the initial motion for summary judgment.

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Are You Held to Know Government Regulations That Are Mere Adoptions of Copyrighted Standards Not Freely Accessible? Perhaps Not

Are You Held to Know Government Regulations That Are Mere Adoptions of Copyrighted Standards Not Freely Accessible? Perhaps Not

This week, we discuss the Indiana Supreme Court's decision in Bellwether Properties, LLC v. Duke Energy Indiana, Inc., which addressed both when a claim may be dismissed under Rule 12(B)(6) for being untimely and whether a person is held to know law that is actually incorporation by reference to copyrighted material, not otherwise freely accessible to the public.

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Indiana Court of Appeals Reverses Rule 41(E) Dismissal for Suspended Lawyer’s Failure to Timely Serve Defendant

Indiana Court of Appeals Reverses Rule 41(E) Dismissal for Suspended Lawyer’s Failure to Timely Serve Defendant

This week, we look to the recent decision in Petrovski v. Neiswinger, which reversed dismissal for failure to prosecute where the delay was caused by a lawyer who was suspended from the practice of law and not the client.

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On First Impression, Indiana Rules Denial of Insurance Coverage Triggers Uninsured Motorist Coverage

On First Impression, Indiana Rules Denial of Insurance Coverage Triggers Uninsured Motorist Coverage

This week's discussion looks to the question of whether a person who causes a car accident and then is subsequently denied coverage for the accident constitutes an “uninsured” so that the injured person may recover against his own insurance policy.

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Indiana Court of Appeals: Woman Injured by Step Down in Aircraft Hangar to Have Her Day in Court

Indiana Court of Appeals: Woman Injured by Step Down in Aircraft Hangar to Have Her Day in Court

This week we discuss Walters v. JS Aviation, Inc., which reversed summary judgment against a woman who was injured when she missed a step down at an aircraft hangar that may not have been properly marked.

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Indiana Supreme Court: No Private Liability for DCS in Releasing Confidential Identifying Information

Indiana Supreme Court: No Private Liability for DCS in Releasing Confidential Identifying Information

We revisit John Doe #1 v. DCS, in which the court of appeals majority had ruled that a person who reported suspected child neglect and whose identifying information was negligently disclosed in violation of an Indiana statute could bring suit against DCS. In this installment, we look at yesterday's decision from the Indiana Supreme Court, wherein the majority held that no claim could be made against DCS.

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